{Girl Crush Tuesday} The fabulous Mia Freedman

We have some pretty hard girl crushes. These are the types of ladies that stamp their style on the world. They are the type of people that will always be remembered and little girls grow up wanting to be. They are women of substance. Women that make the world a better place. Happy Girl Crush Tuesday everybody.line4

Today we salute Mia Freedman. Mia is a fabulously strong woman who uses her voice through many avenues. She is an editor, writer, author and blogger. She was even the youngest ever editor of Australian Cosmopolitan at the age of 24!

What we love about Mia is that she isn’t afraid to go against the norm and give her opinion regardless of the consequences. She stands by her strong opinions and isn’t naïve enough to believe that everyone will agree with her but instead supports the right of free speech.

If you are a parent with internet access you will have no doubt come across Mia’s websites, Ivillage and Mamamia. These sites are read by thousands and thousands of people every single day. She gives a voice and advice to many who don’t know where to go.

Mia isn’t afraid of standing out from the crowd and uses this power to push many causes close to her heart. These include encouraging women to embrace their bodies and giving support to those who have experienced stillborn births and miscarriages.

Mia has been very open about her own experiences with mental illness and in particular living everyday with anxiety. Brave women like Mia who use their positions to talk more openly about these issues increase awareness and acceptance for even more members of the community.

Mia might not be everyone’s cup of tea but to others she is certainly their glass of champagne.

Thanks Mia for showing our little girls not to be afraid of using their voices loudly and proudly and for teaching them that through hard work and a little perseverance anything is possible.

 

 

{My Story} The crippling effect of post-natal anxiety

Today is World Mental Health Day and talking about my experience with post-natal depression and anxiety is difficult but if I don’t and someone else is feeling this way and thinks it is normal that is not okay. After my third daughter was born I lost myself for a while and it was genuinely the most scary time of my life.   group

The alarm sounds and I wake from a broken sleep. I don’t even know what time I eventually got to sleep, plus the baby woke four times.

An ache controls my entire body. Continue reading

{The Nest Health} The Struggle Of New Mums With Postpartum Depression

Please take the time to read this. I cannot stress that enough.

Postpartum depression or anxiety is the MOST common complication of childbirth.

It is non discriminatory. It is horrible. It will engulf you and those you love.

The Struggle of New Mothers With Postpartum Depression will help explain to you what you need to know about this condition.  postpartum

Follow this link to see the full image -> The Struggle of New Mothers With Postpartum Depression

Knowledge is power and you might just save someone you love.

Happy health Nesters x

 

{The Nest Health} Anxiety and the unknown. Finally, someone explains it simply.

One very clever person has finally been able to put into cartoon drawings what people have been trying to say for years.

anxiety cartoon

This is quite possibly the easiest way to describe anxiety to people who don’t understand it (or like myself have never experienced it so struggle to fully understand what it must feel like).

Tumblr user Sophie Wright posted the following images on her blog, Snapdraws, to provide others with a glimpse into life with anxiety.

anxiety2

You can see more here -> Snapdraws – Anxiety Cartoons

You can get help at Beyond Blue or Lifeline.

{My story} Post Natal Depression Awareness week

This week is Post Natal Awareness week and it is important that you, I, everyone support this.

I look at her now and can't even imagine the feelings I once had

I look at her now and can’t even imagine the feelings I once had

Post Natal Depression affects everyone. It is not discriminatory. It doesn’t care if you are rich or poor. Black or white. Young or older. It doesn’t care.  It affects about 1 in every 7 new mothers (and those results are based on people who actually seek help).

I have never really spoken about my post natal experience. Whilst I was never diagnosed with Post Natal Depression I felt panicked. I felt isolated and lost.

I remember feeling extremely guilty because I was unable to soothe my new child. I wondered if she knew I felt like I didn’t love her enough. Is that why she screamed?

Did she know I was lost? That I felt all alone?

I often asked myself if I loved her enough. Shamefully about three weeks in, wondered if I would miss her if someone else took her home.

This led me to feel more guilt. I felt inadequate and hopeless.

I had grown this little child in my body for over nine months. Before I met her I was excited. I envisioned hours of long cuddles and midnight breastfeeds. I would supplement her with my milk, as I believed nature intended. The truth is, I was unable to nourish her alone. My baby could not solely rely on me to provide for her. I felt worthless.

I felt guilty each time I used formula. I felt sad each time I used the bottle steriliser. I cried often as I tried to offer my breast but she refused me.

I was dark and alone. She cried. I cried.

I felt like my guilt was surrounding me, almost, some days drowning me.

I had also been diagnosed with Bells Palsy weeks before having my baby and felt ugly and different. My face still hadn’t returned to normal. I still had pains in my dreams. I felt low and sad.

On top of this, I felt like I wasn’t doing a good enough job. Like deep down my daughter expected more. I was constantly exhausted, not only with the battle of looking after my newborn but with the battle I was fighting each day in my head.

My turning point was a Tuesday. I had spent the day listening to my child wail from her perfect bassinet in her perfect nursery.  After lunch I called my husband and told him to come home. I needed him to close his workshop for the day and come home and save me.

I needed to be saved from this screaming child. I needed to be saved from the heavy expectations of being a new mother. I needed him, above all else, to save me from myself.

He came home and held me. I let him cradle me like a baby. I finally realised I needed to let go. Let go of my expectations. Release my guilt. Free myself.

Then one day, when she was not very old. The clouds above me parted. I looked at her with love. I felt immediately attached to her, like I needed her more than my desire to breathe. I realised that she was mine forever and that was not conditional upon me being perfect. She was me and I was her, a part of our souls intertwined forever.

I have an amazingly supportive husband and great family and friend network. I think that saved me. I think they saved me from myself.postnatal depression

I can look back now and see that dark period as a time of great character building for myself. I tell myself that without experiencing all those emotions I may not have realised how much I am actually capable of. It allowed me to realise that I need not be so hard upon myself but rather enjoy the time without necessarily aiming for perfection.

It is so important that you speak up. If you are a new parent and experiencing any of the following symptoms (for two weeks or more) please ask for help.

  • low mood and/or feeling numb
  • feeling inadequate, like a failure, or feeling guilty, ashamed, worthless, hopeless, helpless, empty or sad
  • often feeling close to tears
  • feeling angry, irritable or resentful (e.g. feeling easily irritated by your other children or your partner)
  • fear for the baby and/or fear of being alone with the baby or the baby being unsettled
  • fear of being alone or going out
  • loss of interest in things that you would normally enjoy
  • insomnia (being unable to fall asleep or get back to sleep after night feeds) or sleeping excessively, having nightmares
  • appetite changes (not eating or over-eating)
  • feeling unmotivated and unable to cope with the daily routine
  • withdrawing from social contact and/or not looking after yourself properly
  • decreased energy and feeling exhausted
  • having trouble thinking clearly or making decisions, lack of concentration and poor memory
  • having thoughts about harming yourself or the baby, ending your life, or wanting to escape or get away from everything.

Take the time to drop in on new parents. Ask if they are okay. Let us support each other, for every person is fighting a battle you may know nothing of.

Please seek help – You can get through this:

Beyond Blue – http://justspeakup.beyondblue.org.au/

Panda – http://www.panda.org.au/

parents

 

Anxiety forum

More people need to talk. Talk about that little tiny voice inside your head that sometimes feels like a giant.

photo source: Relieve Anxiety Now

photo source: Relieve Anxiety Now

Tonight there is a free public forum about Anxiety Disorders in Bathurst.

It is an opportunity to find out more about common Anxiety Disorders and learn about what helps recovery and what services are available locally.

The event will be held at the Bathurst City Community Club at 7pm tonight, Monday October 28th.

You can download the flyer here: Mental Health Association flyer

Any information is good information and might just be the type of information that could help someone you love.

If you need help you can always contact Beyond Blue.

Powerful. Non-discriminatory. Soul-shaking. 1 in 6 people. Are you one?

It can affect anyone. It doesn’t discriminate. Teachers. Doctors. Cleaners. Judges. It doesn’t care.

Image: Alexandra Thompson/Shutterstock

Image: Alexandra Thompson/Shutterstock

It can eat you up. It sleeps with you. It follows you.

It affects everyone around you.

3 Million Australians are living with depression and anxiety.

THREE MILLION! I say that again because it is 3,000,000 Mums. Sons. Fathers. Friends.

According to Beyond Blue, on average, 1 in 6 people – 1 in 5 women and 1 in 8 men – will experience depression at some stage of their lives.

Literally Darling has published one of the most insightful pieces I have read. It tells what it is like watching someone close to you live under the cloud of depression.

Here is the link -> ‘Loving someone with depression’ Please read it. Please take the time.

Image: Pinterest

Image: Pinterest

What makes it worse is that people living in rural areas have an increased risk of developing mental illness. The Central West is rural. Our nests are rural. Your loved ones are rural.

If you, or someone close to you need help please contact your local GP or Beyond Blue. Don’t hide in the shadows. Ask for help. Seek assistance.
beyond blue